Knight Hospital Civil War Monument, New Haven, CT.

Oct. 26, 2014: The Knight Hospital Civil War Monument

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The Knight Hospital Civil War Monument in New Haven, CT. is located in Evergreen Cemetery. It was dedicated in 1870 to honor the 204 wounded Civil War veterans who died in the the hospital and buried near this monument.

These veterans buried here are not specific to New Haven or specific regiment – which is very uncommon among Civil War monument dedications.

The tall column of the monument is of a bearded soldier bearing a shield of Connecticut and a U. S. emblem – the names of several important battles are also listed which include Gettysburg, New Bern N.C. (spelled as New Berne), Fort Fisher N.C. and Fredericksburg, VA. 

DSC_0159There are over 120 graves of Civil War DSC_0156Veterans which surround the base of this monument. Burials took place there from 1862-1865.  It is located on the Winthrop Avenue side of the Evergreen Cemetery – it is easily seen if you drive on the outside road inside the cemetery area.

The Knight Hospital was opened in 1862 as a temporary hospital to treat soldiers wounded in the Civil War. The United States government had leased a building from the New Haven State Hospital – this was before Grace Yale New Haven Hospital was so named. It had been named after Jonathan Knight, president of General Hospital Society of Connecticut’s board and also a professor at the Medical Institution of Yale College. 

Knight Hospital saw and treated in excess of 25,000 patients during the Civil DSC_0155War and transported them back for medical attention from as faraway as North Carolina and Virginia. It makes me ask, “how long were those trips and how were they transported?”

Many of the gravestones are discolored and  hard to read unless cleaned, but this one on the back caught the eye of my camera. So I ask, “Friday Connock, for whom or why did your mother name you Friday?” I can only conclude, “were you born on Friday?” Surely that wasn’t a family name, but you never know…

Maybe one day I will walk and transcribe more names…

All Names have been transcribed at Find A Grave – see link below.

http://membersb.heritagesports.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=vcsr&GSsr=1&GSvcid=367360&

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