2019: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 27 (July 1 – July 07): Independent

2019: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 27 (July 1 – July 07): Independent

“first” joined Amy Johnson Crow’s 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks on its “first” year in 2014… and what a whirlwind year that was… writing, editing and researching daily for 365 days! As much as I wanted to continue the following year, I found that I didn’t have the time to continue another year with that type of research… although I did continue blogging and writing stories at my own pace, which allowed me to write on other topics as well as family stories when ideas came my way… but I’ve often missed it. The first year were no specific weekly prompts like today… but I’m taking a different spin on them. There will be some posts on a specific ancestor, but most will be memories that spring from those prompts. Head over to 2014 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks to read about my ancestors in the first years challenge.

If you’re new to genealogy, make your “first” stop to Amy’s website for genealogy ideas or even join in on this 52 Week challenge… you learn by doing… not procrastinating! There is no right or wrong… anything you do is a start!

giuseppe-gambino

Giuseppe (Joseph) Gambino (Cambino)

I married into an Italian family… a family with stories of times gone by… stories I never tired of hearing… and wrote down! Many of those stories were also centered around a once, great amusement park known as Savin Rock.

Week 27, “Independent” weekly prompt begins with my husband’s maternal grandfather, Giuseppe Cambino (Gambino), who arrived on American soil in 1913. He was a very “independent” young man of age 18 to have left his family and friends… arriving alone here to begin his life.

As the July prompts progress, I will write on other Italian family lines as they crossed the ocean to arrive at Ellis Island… arriving for a better life in America.

The S.S. Moltke arrived in the New York Harbor on May 27th, 1913. The ship departed from Naples, Italy on May 13th for New York… a voyage that would take fourteen days to reach its final destination… the United States. There were many immigrants onboard, alongside Giuseppe, who was eagerly anticipating a new life and “start” in America.

moltke

S. S. Moltke

The “Moltke” was built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg in 1901 for the Hamburg America Line; she had a weight of 12,335 gross tons, length 525.6ft x beam 62.3ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. The Moltke could accommodate 390-1st, 230-2nd and 550-3rd class passengers, and was launched on 08/27/1901. She sailed her maiden voyage from Hamburg to Boulogne, Southampton, and New York on 03/02/1902. On 04/03/1906 she commenced her first sailing between Naples, Genoa and New York and her last voyage, Genoa – Naples – New York – Genoa was on 06/23/1914. Giuseppe sailed on one of her last voyages from Italy to New York.

She was later interned at Genoa in 1914 and on 05/25/1915, was seized by Italy and renamed the “Pesaro”, where she began sailing for the Italian company, Lloyd Sabaudo. In 1925, she was finally scrapped in Italy.

Steerage passenger number ‘five’ on the S.S. Moltke was eighteen-year-old Giuseppe Gambino. Arriving at a young age was on his side, as American immigration authorities tended to look more favorably on the young and healthy who could help build America’s booming industrial base. He entered the United States as Giuseppe Gambino, so written on the ship manifest… but through time, his surname evolved into Cambino. Whether he initiated the change or it changed by accident, we don’t know, but however it changed, it remained Cambino for the rest of his life, into his marriage and became his children’s name. His birth records in Italy clearly show his surname to be “Gambino.” Possibly he secretly want to be “independent” of the Gambino name because of the strong mafia association to it in America.

Ship Manifest of the S. S. Moltke

gambino-manifest1

Gambino, Giuseppe, Male, 18y, South Italy, Italian, South Tramonti, Italy

His nationality (country of which he was a citizen) was listed as Italy; race or people as Italian South; country of last permanent residence was Italy, town of Tramonti. I’ve often pondered on the lines of the second page, where the names were asked of nearest relatives or friend, of from where alien came.  It seems to read as father, Luitalo (sp) and town of Tramonti; his father’s name, from his birth records, was Federico Gambino; he was headed to the destination of New Haven, CT.

Giuseppe verified before boarding that he was not a polygamist, anarchist, or indentured laborer, and had never been in the poorhouse or insane asylum. The ship surgeon and the ship Master both verified that he was in good health for his arrival at Ellis Island. There were strict rules in place at that time, and the ships were strictly held accountable for the health of their passengers. It was in the ships best interest to verify their occupants before sailing, as they were held responsible for the payment home to return those that Ellis Island would not accept; Ellis Island verified everyone entering our country. Immigrants were turned away if they were seen as diseased and unfit… America was looking for able-bodied immigrants to build the melting pot of America.

gambino-manifest-listings1

Of the twenty-three names or so on the ship manifest, Giuseppe was one of twenty-one that was listed as able to read and write. The hopes that these immigrants pinned on the new world were all ahead of them. Living in America gave much more opportunity for themselves and their families. Giuseppe stated that he paid his own passage of forty dollars, and all that was left in his pocket was twenty-five dollars to begin a new life. Giuseppe never wanted to return to Italy, he told his son Johnny many tales of life there and he wanted his children to have a better life. He did not speak Italian in the home, he encouraged them to only learn and speak English. He wanted them to be American!

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The voyage over in steerage was horribly crowded for Giuseppe… crowded in with hundreds of immigrants, unknown to him… all squeezed into tight spaces. Some steamships could accommodate as many as two thousand passengers in steerage; so-called because it was located on the lower decks where the steering mechanism of the sailing ships had once been housed. These long narrow compartments were divided into separate dormitories for single men, women, and families. Inside the steerage cabin were bunks, two or three tiers high, equipped with meager mattresses – often populated with lice. If you were a woman traveling alone, or with your children, sleeping in the same room as a strange man was too immoral to even consider; they often chose to sleep sitting up on the deck. As far as the family stories have been told, Giuseppe came to the United States alone. I can not imagine coming to a foreign country, with little money and no knowledge of the language, but he was coming to meet his brother… from what was written on the manifest.

The water calmed as the S. S. Moltke made its way into the New York Harbor. Most immigrants, eager to catch sight of the new land, hurried up on deck… I’m sure Giuseppe stood with them in wanting a first glimpse of where he now would call home. In Italy, they had heard of the Statue of Liberty but were never exactly sure what it was. Still, to all of them, the first sight must have been unforgettable. The Statue Of Liberty offered them a mute, but powerful ‘welcome’ as it stood silently in the Hudson Harbor… a sign of indepence in this new land.

ellis-island

The Moltke steamed up the Hudson River to a pier where the first-and second-class passengers, native or immigrant, debarked. They hoped their passage through immigration would be quick and courteous, and while they were being cleared, the steerage passengers were kept waiting – and waiting. In an effort to impress the inspectors, immigrants changed into their finest traditional clothes before leaving the ship – often it was the only other clothing packed for the journey.

When it came time for Giuseppe to finally debark with the others, they were all harshly commanded to hurry. Bulky in their many layers of clothing, carrying bedding, trunks, holding onto their only possessions… even cuttings from the family vineyard to transplant in America… they scrambled from the S. S. Moltke; good riddance and glad to leave! They then boarded a barge that transported them over to Ellis Island. Giuseppe always had a vineyard after he married… first at the farm and later when he moved his family to an 1860 saltbox style home, situated directly on Long Island Sound in West Haven, CT. Most Italians kept their traditions from home, wanting to have just a little feeling of “home.

Finally landing, Giuseppe joined his shipmates to line up at the main door – standing like cattle under an enormous metal canopy… about fifty feet wide. He then entered the main building and climbed the immense stairway to the huge Registry Room. In 1913 the room was still divided into iron-railed aisles into which the new arrivals were steered (or shoved) to wait… once again. Five thousand immigrants were processed a day as the Ellis Island staff worked twelve hours a day.

After passing the medical examination, Giuseppe moved through the back of the room to meet the ‘primary’ inspector; the man who would finally give or withhold permission for him to go ashore. The inspector asked Giuseppe a total of twenty-nine questions. What was his name, his age, could he read and write? What was his occupation and destination? All his answers had to exactly match the information previously recorded on the manifest of the S. S. Moltke. Just because you wanted to come and live in the United States… was not the reason to grant you acceptance.

The most difficult question that men often stumbled over was – do you have work waiting for you in the United States? The correct answer was No! The importation of contract labor was illegal and during the time that Giuseppe came, many laborers were deported from Ellis Island when they answered Yes.

After leaving the primary inspector, Giuseppe returned back to the baggage room to gather his belongings and with papers stamped from the primary inspector’s desk, he was now free to enter the United States. He ferried over to the Battery and headed to Grand Central Station to begin his final journey to his listed destination of New Haven, Connecticut. What were his thoughts as he sat on that train, hoping he had been put on the correct train… hoping his brother Francesco would be waiting for him… wondering what would he do if he was not able to find his brother! I imagine there were other Italians on that train of whom he spoke to in his language… riding for almost two hours before reaching Union Station in New Haven. (Possibly his brother Francesco met him at Ellis Island)

Only a third of the immigrants remained in New York City, which kept the railroad office at Ellis Island very busy – sometimes selling as many as twenty-five tickets a minute. Immigrants leaving the island often wore this sign, “To the Conductor: Please show bearer where to change car, or train, and where to get off, as this person does not speak English.” These immigrants were very brave… coming to a foreign land, not knowing the language, hardly having any money in their pockets… often having no family here at all.

Giuseppe Gambino / Cambino was the first of my husband’s direct line of Gambino’s to come to America. From the ship manifest, it showed he was met by his brother, Francis/Francesco (sp from records) – destination listed as New Haven, Connecticut. We can only assume he chose New Haven because of his brother, Frank, supposedly then living there… or Frank took him there to live with friends. Giuseppe did indeed go to New Haven and by 1920 he was still living at 178 Frank St., of where it had been written as his destination. I was never able to determine if Frank actually lived in New Haven with him on Frank St.; I did find Giuseppe listed on the city directory at that address, but never Frank.

A family story told to me, was that his brother Frank showed up one day after Giuseppe was living in West Haven, married with a family; Frank told him he had been searching for him. Maybe he had lost contact because of the name change? After that, he often came yearly, until he returned to Italy.

gambino-francesco

It was told to me by Giuseppe’s son, Johnny, that he lived in the apartment of friends when he first came to New Haven; his father told him that when he was young. That’s probably why I never found his name listed in 1914 as an occupant in the city directory for 178 Frank St.; most likely he rented a room in someone else’s apartment. I did find him listed later in 1920, he was then the sole occupant, and also now listed as a barber at 668 Washington Ave., West Haven; Giuseppe had now begun a business as a barber.

gambino-francesco-2 ship

In searching the Ellis Island website for Giuseppe’s brother, I only came up with one entry for a Francesco (Frank) Gambino. It showed that he left the port of Naples, and arrived on December 21, 1907, married, age twenty-two, sailed on the ship “Konigin Luise,” and was no. 7 on the ship manifest page. Most of the Gambino’s who immigrated to America sailed from Sicily and since he came from the same area as his brother – I might assume that this listing may be him. The age is not correct, as the original family birth listings from Italy, lists his birth date as 1881, which would make him twenty-six years of age; his age could be listed wrong on the ship manifest.

This new “start” for Giuseppe in America brought many changes to the life that he might not have had in Italy. He entered the U. S. as a laborer, but eventually acquired the trade of barbiere (barber) which led him to become a business owner of his own shop – Buddy’s Barber Shop at 668 Washington St. in West Haven, CT. He wanted to be an American, he wanted to start a new life, marry and raise a family in America… he wanted to be “independent.” Giuseppe was part of the “melting pot” who contributed to help America flourish.

I will return to Giuseppe later during the year with another prompt…

If you are family and reading, please feel free to share your thoughts in the comments below. You might even possibly be a new cousin, and if so, I look forward to connecting with you. I began the gathering of these stories and information many years ago and decided that the time was right this year to “start” sharing my husband’s family history! Goda! (Enjoy!

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Continue reading 2019: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks over HERE!

Want to read more on Savin Rock, click…. Savin Rock… Now and Then

To read more Family Stories… click HERE.

© 2019, copyright Jeanne Bryan Insalaco; all rights reserved

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About Jeanne Bryan Insalaco

My blog is at: https://everyonehasafamilystorytotell.wordpress.com/
This entry was posted in 2019: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, Daily Writings and funnies..., Family Stories, Savin Rock and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to 2019: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 27 (July 1 – July 07): Independent

  1. Antoinette Truglio Martin says:

    I find these stories of immigration during the early 20th century fascinating and so relevant to today.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Eilene Lyon says:

    You did such an excellent job of describing the immigrant experience in that time and place. What a surprise to read about the labor question.

    Liked by 1 person

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